Top 5 Innovative Technologies of the 18th Century

Top 5 Innovative Technologies of the 18th Century

Top 5 Innovative Technologies of the 18th Century

The 18th century was the beginning of the first Industrial Revolution where manual labor was being replaced by new inventions and machinery. The transition to new manufacturing processes improved efficiency to everyday life.

  1. Battery
    In 1800, Alessandro Volta invented the first true chemical battery, which came to be known as the Voltaic Pile. It consisted of pairs of copper and zinc discs piled on top of each other, separated by a layer of cloth soaked in brine. The voltaic pile was able to produce the first continuous and stable flow of electric current. Volta’s technology has done wonders for us now, as we are able to use electronic devices at almost any time.
  2. Lightening Rod
    The lightening rod is a metal rod or object connected to the top of an elevated structure to protect it in the event of a lightening strike. Benjamin Franklin first invented the principle of the lightening rod in 1749 to help protect structures from damage due to lightening, as they seemingly got taller. Without Franklin’s invention, many of our skyscrapers would have suffered from damage due to fire or electrocution!
  3. Bi-Focal Eyeglasses
    Benjamin Franklin created the bi-focal lenses in the 1700s as he became tired of switching between two pairs of glasses constantly. He began by cutting both lenses horizontally and combined them to make one single pair that focused at both the bottom and top of the lenses. These eyeglasses allowed users to read and see from far away.
  4. Mercury Thermometer
    Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit created the mercury thermometer in 1714. It consists of a bulb containing mercury attached to a glass tube of narrow diameter. With a change in temperature, the volume of mercury changes as well, driving the mercury up the glass tube allowing us to see the temperature reading. This has been a pillar to the development of the thermometer in even say, your car.
  5. Carbonated Water
    In 1767, Joseph Priestley discovered a method of infusing water with carbon dioxide by suspending a bowl of water above a beer vat. He decided to try a taste and found that the water had a pleasant taste and began to serve it to his colleagues and friends. Since then, the use of carbonated water has led to the mass production of our favorite soft drinks.